Ben May

WordCamp San Francisco 2014

It’s important to us that we remain on the cutting edge of web and online technology, particularly in relation to the WordPress content management system. This is why team members participate in WordPress WordCamps – locally run workshops and conferences held around the world for bloggers, developers, designers and business operators. In October I had the good fortune to attend the largest WordCamp of them all, WordCamp San Francisco.

Sessions at WordCamp San Francisco covered a range of topics. Everything from beginning developer and designer tips to inspiring personal and commercial success stories involving WordPress as a platform. There were also a number of presentations focusing on the nature of WordPress as an open source project and its planned future as an international content management system and application framework. This year included lightning talks where a number of individual presenters gave short yet concise presentations relating to a shared topic.

Speakers and presenters ranged from WordPress co-founder Matt Mullenweg to blogging extraordinaire Chris Lema. Presentations by WordPress core contributors including Andrew Nacin were also held as well as a number of prominent speakers from the blogging and web industries.

The sessions I found the most beneficial were those that focused on advanced WordPress development including upcoming features that allow for more flexible site front-end behaviour. I also enjoyed many of the touching stories where WordPress was used as a tool to help individuals provide aid to impoverished nations or a musician find their place in the technology industry. There was a lot on offer at this year’s WordCamp San Francisco and I enjoyed soaking up the diverse range of information presented.

One other key benefit of attending a WordCamp is the opportunity to network with other WordPress-related businesses and individuals in the community and I was able to meet a number of well-known and talented people.

Attending WordCamp San Francisco 2014 was a great opportunity, not just because of the experience itself, but because in future the team behind WordPress (Automattic) will be moving to a different model – hosting larger WordCamps on a regional basis – WordCamp USA and WordCamp Asia etcetera.